The Feed – Season 1 Episode 7 Recap & Review

Prison Break

In the wake of Lawrence’s death, episode 6 of The Feed begins with his will being read out, leading to a specific clause that requires Ben to leave the room. With an icy atmosphere hanging over the room, Ben refuses to leave and it’s here he learns he’s not Lawrence’s biological son. Outside, Tom speaks to Ben alone and tries to get through to him, only to see his brother walk away.

Meanwhile, the stability of The Feed is thrown into question as numerous people begin to seizure in bed while Eve burns Max’s bloody clothes and struggles to get back to normality following what happened. However, back at the office chaos descends as over 60 people are brought in, including a young child, while Gil is transferred out. A ruthless Sue visits the prisoners while they scream and shout in their holding cells, eventually deciding to move a young girl to a secure holding cell. However, as the guard leaves the room the young girl stops crying, throwing her integrity into question.

Ben drowns his sorrows and indulges in the holographic fantasy of Miyu while Eve heads in to visit Max where we see he’s still alive, despite being shot. She tampers with his drip though and it’s here she learns the painful truth that Max was killed back at the farm. Everything since then was all an elaborate plan to get to Lawrence.

Meanwhile, the Resistance launches a plan to take down The Feed. Dressed in evasive clothing from head to toe, their outfits successfully avoid detection from The Feed. After a close call with several guards, they manage to leave the facility with the files needed and return to their base. Gil is transferred to a prison but inside he’s antagonised by one of the inmates who laments his involvement with The Feed. While Gil is taken to his cell, Tom and Eve work together to try and get him released from prison. Unfortunately, the inmate Gil hit before beats him with a pole in the middle of the night, leaving him a bloody, crimson mess.

A nationwide blackout ensues soon after as the resistance work on their leak. Taking advantageof the chaos, the imprisoned girl reveals herself to be hacked and she stabs one of the guards repeatedly before breaking everyone else out. When reinforcements arrive, they overpower the guards and start to leave. Meanwhile, Danny witnesses one of the seizures firsthand as the resistance struggle to get the systems back online again.

Miyu witnesses Ben’s mental instability firsthand too during the blackout, and as he tells her to increase compliance while they start kissing. She pushes him off and asks him outright what’s wrong, before forcing him to leave. At the office, police arrive to take control of the situation while the little girl visits Max in his bed. With the blackout still in-force, Meredith walks in to her home to find a tear-stricken Ben who finally admits that it was him who caused the leak.

Back home, Kate and Tom come to blows over their own ideals. As Kate leans heavily into disrupting The Feed completely and taking it offline, Tom tells her about the ordeal with Bea almost being taken and reminds her The Feed keeps them safe. Alone, Tom begins weeping while Eve conjures up a holographic version of Max, seemingly using the same corrupted app that Ben used.

With the plot gearing up for a dramatic crescendo to the plotline this season, The Feed continues to deliver the goods here with another strong episode. While some of the familial drama continues to feel quite melodramatic, for the most part the show does well to keep things interesting with a good injection of pace. The blackout is well worked into the story too and seeing Ben unable to distinguish the difference between fantasy and reality throws more societal questions into the mix surrounding our addiction to digital technology.

Quite what will happen next though remains to be seen but based on this episode, The Feed is gearing up for quite the dramatic finale.

 

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  • Episode Rating
4

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