10 Stunning Books Like The Midnight Library | TheReviewGeek Recommends

The Midnight Library is a novel by Matt Haig that tells the story of a young woman named Nora who is stuck in a life she doesn’t want. After a series of unfortunate events, she finds herself in an ethereal library between life and death that contains countless volumes of books representing all possible lives she could have lived. If you’re a fan of Haig’s thought-provoking novel and are looking for similar books that explore themes of self-discovery, second chances, and the power of choices, then you’re in luck. Here are 10 stunning books like The Midnight Library:


In the Ravenous Dark by A.M. Strickland

In the Ravenous Dark by A.M. Strickland is a captivating dark fantasy tale that follows Rovan, a young girl who discovers her ability to resurrect the dead. In a world filled with magic and danger, Rovan embarks on a journey of self-discovery, confronting her past and grappling with the consequences of her newfound power. As she delves deeper into her abilities, Rovan finds herself questioning her own identity and the boundaries of life and death. With its exploration of personal transformation and the consequences of choices, In the Ravenous Dark is thematically similar to The Midnight Library, making it a compelling read for fans of introspective tales.


The Secret Keeper of Jaipur by Alka Joshi

The Secret Keeper of Jaipur by Alka Joshi is a captivating novel set in India that tells the story of a young woman named Malik who is determined to save her ancestral hotel business from a modern development threat. As Malik delves into the intricacies of her family’s past, she uncovers hidden secrets that challenge her notions of loyalty and love.

Exploring themes of identity, cultural heritage, and the clash between tradition and progress, the novel delves into the complexities of life’s choices and the power of resilience. Fans of Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library will appreciate the thought-provoking nature of The Secret Keeper of Jaipur and its exploration of the consequences of one’s decisions.


The Library of the Dead by T. L. Huchu

The Library of the Dead by T.L. Huchu is an exciting urban fantasy novel that follows Ropa, a young girl living in Edinburgh who can communicate with the dead. When a mysterious client offers her a job in the city’s ancient library to find a missing book, Ropa delves deeper into Edinburgh’s supernatural underworld and discovers a horrifying conspiracy that threatens the entire city.

With its exploration of identity, loss, and death, the novel shares similar themes with Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library. However, it offers a unique take on the concept of alternate lives and the power of choices in shaping one’s destiny.


The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow

The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow is a spellbinding historical fantasy that takes place in an alternate version of late 19th-century America. It follows the journey of three estranged sisters, each with their own unique powers, as they rediscover the lost magic of witchcraft and join the suffragette movement to fight for women’s rights. Through their collective efforts, they challenge patriarchal oppression and ignite a powerful revolution that echoes across time. With echoes of Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library, the novel explores themes of resilience and the transformative power of fighting for one’s beliefs.


The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman is a delightful mystery novel set in a retirement village where a group of senior citizens meet every Thursday to solve cold cases. When a real murder occurs on their doorstep, they use their knowledge, wit, and unconventional methods to crack the case.

As secrets and surprises unravel, the story takes unexpected twists and turns, keeping readers engaged until the very end. While The Thursday Murder Club differs in genre from Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library, both books share a similar sense of exploration and adventure, and both authors share a similar style of wit and comedy.


Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

Anxious People by Fredrik Backman is a heartwarming novel about a group of strangers brought together by a failed bank robbery. The group finds themselves held hostage in an apartment viewing, where they each reveal their fears, anxieties, and secrets.

As the situation escalates, they discover unexpected connections between them that help them find a way forward. Similar to Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library, the book explores the theme of human resilience and the power of introspection


Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid is a compelling family drama set in the 1980s during a legendary party thrown by the Riva siblings — famous children of a renowned singer. As the night unfolds, the past collides with the present, secrets are unveiled, and familial bonds are tested.

With its vivid characters and intricate relationships, the story explores themes of love, forgiveness, and the complexities of family dynamics. While it differs in concept and setting, Malibu Rising shares a similar depth of character exploration and the exploration of alternate lives as found in Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library.


Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr

Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr is an epic and imaginative tale that weaves together the lives of five characters across different periods and settings. From ancient Greek society to a futuristic spaceship, their stories converge around a mysterious ancient text known as Cloud Cuckoo Land.

Through their journeys, the novel explores themes of hope, resilience, and the power of storytelling. While it differs in plot and structure, Cloud Cuckoo Land shares similarities with Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library in its exploration of different lives and the idea that our choices have far-reaching consequences that can shape our destinies.


The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab

The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue by V. E. Schwab is a captivating tale about a young woman named Addie who makes a Faustian bargain to live forever but is cursed to be forgotten by everyone she meets. The story follows Addie through the centuries as she navigates the challenges and joys of her unique existence.

Set against the backdrop of different historical periods, the book delves deep into themes of identity, love, and the search for meaning. Like Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library, it explores the concept of alternate lives and the profound impact our past choices can have on our future sense of self.


Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune

Under the Whispering Door by TJ Klune tells the story of Wallace Price, a workaholic lawyer who unexpectedly finds himself dead and stuck in a mystical tea shop called Charon’s Crossing. There, he meets a colourful cast of characters, including a reaper named Hugo and a talking dog named Apollo.

As Wallace begins to come to terms with his mortality, he is forced to examine his past with a deep sense of introspection. While the book differs in plot and setting, like Matt Haig’s The Midnight Library, it explores themes of self-reflection, redemption, and what we do to shape our lives.


These ten books will captivate readers who enjoy the themes of self-reflection, and the consequences of choice. Have you read The Midnight Library? Have you read any of our recommendations for books like The Midnight Library? Comment below and let us know!


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